5 Aug 2014

Pronunciation - connected speech

Having mastered the articulation of individual sounds, both vowels and consonants, you need to be able to pronounce them in context. You also need to know what happens to them  in connected speech (what processes they undergo). Click on the links below to familiarise yourselves with the various processes. I'll keep updating this post. :)

Aspects of connected speech:

Linking
BBC Pronunciation tips: Connected speech
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/pron/features/connected.shtml
Linking
http://linkingphonetics.wordpress.com
Intrusive r
http://blogg.lnu.se/english-language-blog/blog/category/pronunciation/
Linking r
http://taylorenglish.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/linking-r-sound-in-spoken-english/
Linking w, j, r
http://taylorenglish.wordpress.com/2013/06/09/pronunciation-linking-words-with-sounds-w-y-and-r/
Connected speech
http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/articles/connected-speech

Assimilation
Advanced materials available here:
http://www.slideshare.net/vanyendao/chapter-8-aspect-of-connected-speech
http://faculty.mu.edu.sa/public/uploads/1385479070.7215234766cf-cc38-46da-ba2f-612b0de8727e_2.pdf
Sound Patterns of Spoken English - sound files for devoicing, assimilation, elision, glottal stops, etc. (!)
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/shockey/downloads.htm
Voice assimilation - A very interesting post by Prof. Wells on irregular plural voicings
Where to find examples of some of the processes? 
Intrusive r
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibpJvtB4WIE   (from 2:56)

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